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Archive for the tag “gay books”

Building up the gay steampunk genre

A remark by an author I follow made me start thinking about the gay steampunk genre, because, yes, LGBT authors have tackled this style of storytelling alongside the more commonly seen romance, suspense, mystery and fantasy.

Not everyone understands the meaning of steampunk in general. There are varying definitions, but basically, it’s a subgenre of science fiction/fantasy that features advanced machines or other technology typically taking place in a historical period or fantasy world. The exact definition would call for this technology to be based on the steam power of the 19th century, but my interpretation is a little looser based on the books I see. Basically, anything that’s set in a historic period — in this world or another — and incorporates futuristic technology that did not exist in that period could be considered some variation of steampunk.

After RJ Scott made a comment on Goodreads about gay steampunk, I did a mental inventory and realized I had several books in this subgenre without realizing it.

Here are a few authors of gay steampunk you could explore:

sasha

Sasha L. Miller, author of “Stolen Hearts” and “The Novelty Maker.”

Sasha’s “Stolen Hearts” blends magic and mechanics, when a fairy is in danger of dying after his heart is stolen and replaced by a charm.

See the book on Amazon

 

gearheartHollis Shiloh, author of “Gearheart,” “Wes & Kit” and “Cold Hands, Warm Heart,” among others.

Several of Shiloh’s gay steampunk books take place in a world where men who might have died during the war were saved with the help of mechanical parts, only to be discarded and discriminated once the war is over.

Find “Gearheart” on Amazon

 

spiritsJordan L. Hawk, author of the Spirits series (and other fantasy reads). This one might be skirting the line of the steampunk genre definition, but it has elements that fit.

The Spirits series in set in a historic period, in which a scientist and a medium partner to confront a haunting. The devices invented by Henry Strauss give this series a steampunk feel, even if it doesn’t entirely fit. Find books here

Amber Kell, author of “Keys.” Kell is just venturing into gay steampunk, and “Keys” is the result. I have not read this book, but it definitely fits the subgenre. Find the book.

Have you read any gay steampunk? My list is pretty short, so please offer up some reading suggestions!

DJ Jamison is a book blogger and author of the Ashe Sentinel Connections series of novellas (not steampunk). To explore her books — including a freebie — click here

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Jordan L Hawk has the recipe for delicious storytelling

Whyborne and Griffin novels by Jordan L Hawk

Book 1

Who wouldn’t like a series of books that are intellectual, mysterious, paranormal and romantic?

Sometimes, it feels a little as if Jordan L Hawk has thrown a melting pot of genres into the Whyborne and Griffin novels, but instead of a goupy mess she has concocted delicious storytelling. Hawk’s author bio reads that she grew up on tales of haints and mountain magic, and those influences certainly come through in her books.

Perhaps this is part of the reason why the Whyborne & Griffin series — going strong after 6 full-length novels and a couple of shorter novellas — has such staying power.

First, there’s the intellectual: We’ll give this esteemed designation to Percival Endicott Whyborne, a scholar at the Ladysmith Museum who reads dead languages (and eventually learns the arts of sorcery). It could be argued there are plenty of other intellectuals in the book, such as Whyborne’s colleague, Christine, a noted archaeologist.

Then, there’s the mysterious: With Griffin Flaherty, an ex-Pinkerton detective, at his side, is it any wonder there’s plenty of mystery to these books? But unlike those old “whodunnit” mysteries, you can bet Whyborne’s skills will be just as necessary as Griffin’s to unravel the truth.

Hoarfost

Book 6

The Paranormal is Paramount, too: From monsters that can melt the skull of a man to a sorceress risen from the dead, Whyborne and Griffin find plenty of otherworldly forces to fight book after book. Each tale is painstakingly developed, with a scholarly dedication that befits the creator of Whyborne.

Last, but not least, is the Romance: Whyborne’s character begins as a repressed gay man determined to suppress his desires after the death of a friend he secretly loved. Griffin bears his own scars after a traumatic experience with the Pinkertons and a forced stay at an insane asylum. Throughout the series, their relationship evolves from attraction to love to commitment, weathering all the rocky points in between. As the series’ broader story themes develop, so does Whyborne and Griffin’s relationship.

I love gay fiction — from sweet romance to paranormal/fantasy — but even if you don’t particularly seek out gay themes in your reading choices, I urge you to explore this series. If you love books that are smart, mysterious, otherworldly and romantic, then this is the series for you.

Explore the Whyborne & Griffine series of books here. 

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